Purdue University develops new MRI-compatible device for diagnostics


Researchers at the Purdue University in the US have developed a new MRI-compatible, wireless recording device to bridge neuro-technologies for diagnostics and enhance the safety of patients.

The technology is developed by Purdue College of Engineering graduate research assistants Ranajay Mandal and Nishant Babaria under the guidance of Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering and the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering assistant professor Zhongming Liu.

When placed in existing MRI machines, the small self-learning device allows simultaneous medical imaging and recording, enabling effective and safe patient monitoring.

Babaria said: “MRI is a very common imaging tool, used in every medical domain to produce high-resolution information about the body and organs.

“However, when a patient is receiving an MRI scan, it is very difficult to also monitor brainwaves, ECG, or other biological signals.

“MRI alone does not always provide enough information to clinicians. There is tremendous scientific and clinical value in using multiple technologies together on a single platform.”

Designed to work together with any MRI system, the new technology acquires electrophysiological signals that occur during scanning.

"When placed in existing MRI machines, the small self-learning device allows simultaneous medical imaging and recording, enabling effective and safe patient monitoring."

The device will record, stimulate and image the organs such as the brain via the MRI system, as well as help monitor more than one diagnostic result.

It is expected to provide improved safety, efficacy and precision of medical diagnostics in patients with diseases such as epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, and depression.

Babaria further added: “Several people from almost a dozen universities requested the device for their own research.

“We’re eager to move forward with testing so that we can finalise and get the device in the hands of those who need it.”


Image: When placed into existing MRI machines, the device allows medical professionals to perform concurrent medical imaging and recording. Photo: courtesy of Shannon Kane/Purdue Research Foundation Image.