7 September 2018 (Last Updated October 29th, 2018 16:49)

In this issue: A new in vivo networking system to power and communicate with medical devices, mobile diagnostics service VisitHealth, a new electronic chip for disposable diagnostics, examining the efficacy of human organ systems in pharma testing, plus the latest comment and analysis from GlobalData’s healthcare experts.

In this issue: A new in vivo networking system to power and communicate with medical devices, mobile diagnostics service VisitHealth, a new electronic chip for disposable diagnostics, examining the efficacy of human organ systems in pharma testing, plus the latest comment and analysis from GlobalData’s healthcare experts.

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Researchers at MIT have created a new in vivo networking system that can wirelessly power and communicate with medical devices inside the body. The hope is that by eliminating the need for batteries devices can be made much smaller, opening up new possibilities for drug delivery, monitoring and treatment. We speak to the team behind the study to find out more.

Plus, we take a look at UK-based mobile diagnostics service VisitHealth to find out how tech is helping GPs to remotely communicate with and treat patients in their home, explore the potential of a new electronic chip intended for use as part of a disposable diagnostic tool, and profile the fast-growing medical technology sector in Costa Rica.

Also in this issue, we examine the efficacy of human organ systems in pharma testing and find out how life sciences organisations can overcome barriers to digital transformation in research and development.

As always, we also round up the latest news from GlobalData’s healthcare analysts on market dynamics, product innovation, regional developments and regulatory issues.

In this issue

Wireless charging: the breakthrough medical devices are waiting for?

Miniature implants hold the possibility for drug delivery, continuous monitoring and personalised treatment wrapped up in a compact in vivo device. Now, researchers at MIT and their colleagues have developed a new system that can wirelessly power and communicate with medical implants inside the body, a huge step in realising their potential. Charlotte Edwards reports.

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Healthcare in the home: how VisitHealth is using tech to help GPS better diagnose patients

Yulia Smal created mobile diagnostics service VisitHealth after realising that her sick daughter could be treated more effectively using remote technology to communicate with her doctor, than in a hospital by unfamiliar clinicians. Allie Nawrat finds out how the VisitHealth system works and what opportunities there are for the platform within a more tech-focussed NHS.

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Disposable diagnostics: fighting antimicrobial resistance in the field

Dr Maria Daniela Angione of Trinity College Dublin has developed an electronic chip intended for use as part of a disposable diagnostic tool. Now undergoing preclinical trials, it could quickly detect bacterial infections and help address the growing problem of antimicrobial resistance. Abi Millar discovers more about the technology.

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Organs on a stick: the growing potential of human organ systems

In contrast to costly and inefficient traditional animal and human pharma testing methods, the use of human organ systems is proving to be more accurate, reliable and cheaper way to get drugs to the market. Dr Ken Gabriel, president and CEO of R&D company Draper, explores the growing potential of the technology.

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Inside Costa Rica’s super-sized medical device sector

In 2017, medical devices became Costa Rica’s top export, surpassing the agricultural sector for the first time in the country’s history. With more than 70 medical device companies operating in Costa Rica, how has this small nation managed to develop such a successful and fast-growing medical technology sector? Chris Lo finds out.

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Overcoming barriers to digital transformation in research & development

For life sciences R&D to fully benefit from the opportunities offered by digital technologies, organisations must be clear what it is they are aiming for. But, diverse ambitions and disjointed initiatives are muddying the picture and hampering progress. Achieving hoped-for results requires clarity, rigour and coordination in the design of projects. Dr Nicholas Lakin, vice president of advisory services at Kinapse, charts a pragmatic way forward.

Read more.

Next issue preview

There has been little advancement in the technology used to transport organs for transplantation since the first successful heart transplant in the 1960s, but despite its ubiquity, the iconic ice box method has its limitations. We take a look at innovations at the frontier of the tech trusted to transport human organs.

Also, we examine a new bioengineering technique developed by scientists at the New York Stem Cell Foundation called segmental additive tissue engineering, which allows researchers to combine segments of bone engineered from stem cells to create large-scale, personalised bone grafts, and speak to US-based lawyer Matthew Jacobson to get the comprehensive legal view on 3D printing in medical device manufacturing.

Plus, we find out about the OLO blood diagnostics system launched by Israeli start-up Sight Diagnostics, which uses machine learning and computer vision to provide complete blood count test results on the spot.

And as always, we round up the latest news from the medical device industry, and get comment and analysis from GlobalData’s healthcare analysts on market dynamics, product innovation, regional developments and regulatory issues.