Digirad introduces Breast Imaging Accessory for spotting lesions in breast tissue

24 February 2013 (Last Updated February 24th, 2013 18:30)

Diagnostic imaging products developer Digirad has introduced its Molecular Breast Imaging accessory, designed as an adjunctive diagnostic for use with the company's ergo imaging system.

Digirad

Diagnostic imaging products developer Digirad has introduced its Molecular Breast Imaging accessory, designed as an adjunctive diagnostic for use with the company's ergo imaging system.

Featuring a user-friendly design, the Molecular Breast Imaging accessory enables physicians to spot lesions in dense and complex breast tissue, and other small body parts.

The Breast Imaging Accessory, which includes a specialised imaging assembly, captures all normal mammographic views for direct correlation with the patient's mammogram, using its breast-mode software.

The adjunctive device also utilises the company's Large Field of View (LFOV) solid-state detector technology with an oversized field-of-view to obtain comprehensive, high-contrast images.

The technology's open design also provides easy access for hands-free breast positioning on patients who can be seated, standing, or lying down during the examination, according to the company.

Digirad chief executive officer Todd Clyde said with the launch of the Molecular Breast Imaging Accessory, the company has expanded its imaging technology in the hospital through the use of flexible, portable ergo system having expanded diagnostics capabilities.

"Advanced diagnostic modalities are often necessary to help clinicians identify lesions in the breast, and our new Molecular Breast Imaging Accessory provides this capability," Clyde said.

"It is a cost-effective, non-dedicated option for molecular breast imaging that enhances the clinical capabilities and operational efficiencies of the ergo Imaging System."


Image: Molecular Breast Imaging Accessory enables physicians to spot lesions in dense and complex breast tissue, and other small body parts. Photo: Courtesy of Digirad.