NEBA Health announces validation results of FDA-approved brainwave-based test for ADHD

8 March 2015 (Last Updated March 8th, 2015 18:30)

NEBA Health has announced validation results for the first US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) cleared biomarker, which can assist in the reduction of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) overdiagnosis.

NEBA Health has announced validation results for the first US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) cleared biomarker, which can assist in the reduction of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) overdiagnosis.

NEBA is a 15-20 minute test that integrates an EEG biomarker for ADHD into the clinical setting.

Published by Brain and Behavior, results for the brainwave-based test NEBA showed its ability to limit overdiagnosis by helping with identification of children with ADHD-like symptoms. The test can help determine if symptoms can be explained by other conditions.

The study involved a comparison of evaluation reports compiled by a multidisciplinary team to that of an individual clinician. The multidisciplinary team involved a pediatrician, a psychologist, and a psychiatrist.

NEBA Health research team head Steven Snyder said: "Our multidisciplinary results showed ADHD may be overdiagnosed in the clinic as much as one third of the time.

"Published by Brain and Behavior, results for the brainwave-based test NEBA showed its ability to limit overdiagnosis by helping with identification of children with ADHD-like symptoms."

"NEBA separately identified most of those cases."

Earlier reports suggested that a multidisciplinary team's evaluation is better to determine if other conditions are instigating ADHD-like symptoms.

The research study assessed the individual clinician's outcome with or without NEBA.

It suggested that NEBA use can assist with better identification of children who are more susceptible to conditions known to mimic ADHD such as head injury, auditory processing disorder, and substance abuse.

Mr Snyder said: "Because underdiagnosis can lead to poor future outcomes in children with ADHD, a lot of effort has gone into developing assessment tests that are sensitive in detecting ADHD-like symptoms."

The integration is likely to help clinicians to rule out children who have ADHD-like symptoms, but who are not affected by it.