Sorin reveals positive clinical data for dual-chamber implantable cardioverter defibrillators

13 May 2013 (Last Updated May 13th, 2013 18:30)

Sorin Group has announced that its Sorin dual-chamber implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) have performed positively during a clinical study.

Sorin Group has announced that its Sorin dual-chamber implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) have performed positively during a clinical study.

The results of the Option study, presented during the Heart Rhythm Society's 2013 Annual Scientific Meeting, demonstrated that patients with the company's ICDs have less chances of experiencing inappropriate shocks compared with those with standard single-chamber devices.

The study, the endpoints of which were the occurrence of appropriate and inappropriate shocks and all-cause mortality, was conducted on 462 patients at 54 centres in Europe and North America, and observed that all-cause mortality was nil between the two groups.

Patients were randomised to either dual-chamber or standard single-chamber ICD therapy, with an average follow-up time of over two years.

Principal study investigator Dr Christof Kolb said that the development was good news for patients as inappropriate shocks have long been associated with poor quality of life and adverse outcomes.

"The results of the Option study demonstrated that patients with the company's ICDs have less chances of experiencing inappropriate shocks compared with those with standard single-chamber devices."

"The findings demonstrate that patients can rest assured that their Sorin ICD is correctly monitoring their heart and delivering only the therapy that is needed," Kolb said.

According to the company, Sorin dual-chamber ICDs are equipped with the PARAD+ arrhythmia discrimination algorithm to reduce inappropriate shocks and the SafeR pacing mode to minimise unwanted ventricular pacing.

Sorin Group CRM Business Unit president Stefano Di Lullo said the company is committed to developing technologically advanced devices to provide lifesaving smart therapies, which are beneficial to both physicians and patients.

"We continue to invest in advancing knowledge about cardiac rhythm disorders and will support clinical trials that provide the strongest possible evidence supporting our therapies," Lullo said.