Stratasys releases 3D printing WREX device case study

5 August 2012 (Last Updated August 5th, 2012 18:30)

Additive manufacturing machines maker, Stratasys, has released a case study of its 3D printing Wilmington Robotic Exoskeleton (WREX), designed as a treatment for arthrogryposis multiplex congenita disorder.

Additive manufacturing machines maker, Stratasys, has released a case study of its 3D printing Wilmington Robotic Exoskeleton (WREX), designed as a treatment for arthrogryposis multiplex congenita disorder.

"The 3D printing device enabled the child to overcome limited joint mobility and underdeveloped muscles."

Assistive WREX device is made of hinged metal bars and resistance bands which enables kids with underdeveloped arms to play, feed themselves and hug.

The study, which included 4-year old suffering from a congenital disorder, was conducted by researchers at the Nemours / Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US.

Researchers used a dimension 3D printer to create the 'magic arms', according to the company.

The 3D printing device enabled the child to overcome limited joint mobility and underdeveloped muscles.

Scott Crump, Stratasys chairman and CEO, said as engineers want technical work to connect to a greater good, 3D printing is helping to bring their ideas to fruition to improve lives.

"Some of our world's greatest ideas are being 3D-printed," Crump added.

"As more people become aware of the possibilities of 3D printing, its impact outside of traditional manufacturing and design realms will continue to grow."

Wohlers Associates, a 3D-printing market consultancy, said that: "As applications grow, the users of the technology grow as well ... It seems that almost any problem involving three-dimensional objects can be solved faster and better with the use of additive manufacturing technology."