Urgent action may reduce future impact of atrial fibrillation in Europe, says report

4 June 2015 (Last Updated June 4th, 2015 18:30)

Rand Europe has launched a new report, which highlights that urgent action is critical to alleviating the potential impact of atrial fibrillation (AF) at the ongoing Heart Rhythm Week in Brussels, Germany.

Rand Europe has launched a new report, which highlights that urgent action is critical to alleviating the potential impact of atrial fibrillation (AF) at the ongoing Heart Rhythm Week in Brussels, Germany.

Entitled the Future of Anticoagulation, the report explores how current decisions can change and re-shape the landscape of tomorrow and have the potential to make a significant difference in changing the direction of AF in terms of prevalence and impact.

The report is based on findings of a study, which aimed to assess the current landscape and challenges for AF management in Europe and explore how it can evolve.

"The report is based on findings of a study, which aimed to assess the current landscape and challenges for AF management in Europe and explore how it can evolve."

Focused on Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK, the study sought to develop an evidence base on the current reality of AF-related anticoagulation management and to develop an understanding of actions that can be taken to improve the outlook for future AF management.

Financially supported by Daiichi Sankyo Europe, the report makes three primary short-term recommendations, including improving AF awareness among the public and policy makers, supporting education about AF management for healthcare professionals and patients, and maintaining AF 0elated research across health services to monitor what works best in terms of interventions.

Future of Anticoagulation steering committee chair John Camm said: "This report is a wake-up call for healthcare professionals and policy makers across Europe to work together to better manage AF, as its burden looks set to double as our population ages.

"I would especially like to highlight that we need to improve healthcare policies related to AF, including improving diagnosis and supporting earlier treatment interventions, such as effective modern anticoagulant medicines, to ensure that we can ultimately prevent avoidable deaths across the continent."

The report also includes contributions from a panel of leading European medical, patient group and health economic experts.

A disorder of the rhythm of the heart, AF is the most common sustained arrhythmia in the general population affecting nearly 1.5-2% of the population in the developed world, and is expected to be a leading health burden in the European Union in the next few years.