WHO approves PrePex non-surgical male circumcision device

3 June 2013 (Last Updated June 3rd, 2013 18:30)

The World Health Organization (WHO) has approved the PrePex non-surgical male circumcision device developed by Israel-based Circ MedTech.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has approved the PrePex non-surgical male circumcision device developed by Israel-based Circ MedTech.

The device, which uses an elastic band to block the blood supply to the foreskin, causing it to die and fall off, is the only adult circumcision method aside from conventional surgery to receive approval from the WHO.

This device can be fitted by a two two-nurse team within four minutes in a procedure that does not require general anesthetic or sterile conditions, reported the New York Times.

The device is disposable and easy to ship and store, and the procedure is considered to be cheaper than surgery.

Circ MedTech noted that the PrePex procedure does not involve needles, loss of blood or stitches, and the individuals can return to their dairy routine immediately.

"The device, which uses an elastic band to block the blood supply to the foreskin, causing it to die and fall off, is the only adult circumcision method aside from conventional surgery to receive approval from the WHO."

The new device is expected to lower the spread of AIDS in Africa, where sterile surgical conditions are often not available.

In 2007, the WHO noted that male circumcision in high risk parts of Africa can reduce the risk of HIV infection by 60%.

The foreskin acts as HIV's main entry point to the body during penetrative sex, thereby increasing the risk of infection.

In 2011, UNAIDS, the US Government, the WHO, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the World Bank introduced an action plan to undertake 20 million voluntary circumcisions by 2015.

According to Circ MedTech, employing PrePex can help achieve this goal in safe, simple and scalable way.