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Forsyth, Quanterix, BIDMC to collaborate on TB test

13 February 2012

Quanterix Corporation, a developer of new generation molecular diagnostic tests, will join forces with Forsyth Institute and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), to develop an improved test for the diagnosis of active tuberculosis (TB).

Using Quanterix's Single Molecule Array (SiMoA) technology, the alliance will work towards the development of a diagnostic test for TB, and will validate low abundance protein biomarkers that may be useful for detecting individuals with active disease.

Under the strategic collaboration, Quanterix will continue to expand its infectious disease applications to include the development of a fast and simple test that will enable accurate diagnosis of active TB in high-burden countries.

Quanterix's vice president of research David Duffy said, "The Forsyth Institute has utilised a proteomics-based approach to identify a panel of novel M. tuberculosis markers present in the urine of human patients with active TB, but conventional protein detection platforms lack the analytical sensitivity to reliably detect these proteins in urine or blood."

"Using SiMoA, we are routinely able to improve the sensitivity of existing immunoassays by more than 1,000-fold, enabling accurate measurement of analytes that have previously been considered undetectable," Duffy added.

"Applying our technology to evaluate biomarkers that could not otherwise be detected will allow us to address a variety of important unmet medical needs, including the development of an improved test for the diagnosis of active tuberculosis."

Forsyth Global Infectious Disease Research Center director Dr Antonio Campos-Neto said, "The development of a more sensitive and specific TB test could save hundreds of thousands of lives annually. We are thrilled to partner with Quanterix to combine our proprietary content with their SiMoA technology."

Quanterix is developing its proprietary SiMoA technology for the in vitro diagnostics and life science research markets. It will allow researchers to validate novel, low abundance biomolecules from a single droplet of blood, leading to greater insight into disease detection, diagnosis, therapy selection and disease monitoring.

 

Image: Photomicrograph of a sputum sample containing mycobacterium tuberculosis. Photo: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention