GE and Global Good sign licensing deal with Access Bio for malaria diagnostics


GE and Global Good Fund have entered a licensing deal with diagnostics technology developer Access Bio for the manufacture and distribution of new rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) to detect asymptomatic malaria in low-resource regions.

Co-developed by GE Global Research Centre and Global Good, the new malaria diagnostic technologies are expected to aid in the global elimination of the disease.

Formed as a result of an alliance between Intellectual Ventures and Bill Gates, Global Good focuses on the invention of technology to improve the quality of life in low and middle-income countries.

The move is part of GE’s strategy to drive its commercialisation through innovation and growth with partners.

GE Global Research technical discipline leader Joseph Suriano said: “The combination of RDTs and serology tests will fill an important gap in the toolset for the eradication of malaria.

"By being able to see if a population has been recently exposed to the malaria parasite with serology tests, we can then efficiently target the use of more rapid, highly sensitive tests and other antimalarial interventions to act before outbreaks occur."

“By being able to see if a population has been recently exposed to the malaria parasite with serology tests, we can then efficiently target the use of more rapid, highly sensitive tests and other antimalarial interventions to act before outbreaks occur.”

In addition to a sensitive diagnostic test to identify key proteins in malaria and Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) RDT for detection of the malaria parasite, the agreement covers a technology for the creation of malaria serology tests for Plasmodium antibodies to measure past disease exposure.

Access Bio CEO Young Ho Choi said: “With our commercialisation experience and mass production facilities, Access Bio will be able to fully accommodate the commercialisation of the highly sensitive RDTs at affordable prices.

“These tests will be the next generation of diagnostic testing and a big step towards the eradication of malaria.”