LEO Science and Wellman Centre to develop imaging technology and microbiopsy device


Denmark-based LEO Pharma’s research and development (R&D) unit LEO Science and Tech Hub has partnered with US-based Wellman Centre for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital to develop new imaging technology and a disposable microbiopsy device.

Under the collaboration, LEO Science will provide research funding to support two separate development programmes.

With expertise on microscopy and spectroscopy, the lab led by Harvard Medical School assistant professor Conor Evans will work towards developing imaging technologies for non-invasive, high-resolution, and real-time pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) measurements.

The lab will make use of its coherent Raman scattering (CRS) technology that allows chemically specific imaging by identifying molecular vibrations specific to drugs and tissues.

"The firm’s partnership with the R Rox Anderson’s Lab will involve the development of a painless, suture-free, disposable microbiopsy device to potentially enable a non-scarring sampling procedure of full-thickness skin microbiopsies."

LEO Science and Tech Hub vice-president Dr Michael Sierra said: "At LEO Science and Tech Hub, we firmly believe in the power of collective effort and are always seeking cutting-edge technologies to advance non-invasive biopsy and imaging technologies for patients with skin diseases.”

The firm’s partnership with the R Rox Anderson’s Lab will involve the development of a painless, suture-free, disposable microbiopsy device to potentially enable a non-scarring sampling procedure of full-thickness skin microbiopsies.

The device will also be used to carry out frequent sampling in clinical studies to aid further understanding of disease profile.

In June, the Hub has also formed an alliance with The Karp Lab at Brigham and Women’s Hospital for minimally invasive technologies to assess dermal biomarkers, and with Novopyxis for a needle-free aerosol-based drug delivery device to deliver skin treatments topically.


Image: Coherent Raman imaging used to picture mouse skin ‘tuned’ into the vibrational frequencies of lipids at the surface of the skin. Photo: courtesy of LEO Science and Tech Hub.