Medibio and Emory University report positive outcome from new PTSD diagnosis study


Australian firm Medibio has collaborated with Emory University in the US to evaluate a new non-invasive technology for the diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Developed by researchers at Emory University, the new diagnostic and monitoring technology is designed to use heart rate data and machine learning algorithms to diagnose the disorder.

The new approach was assessed in a study led by Emory researchers Gari Clifford and Amit Shah, and funded by Medibio in collaboration with the US Department of Veterans Affairs that supplied its twins database.

During the research, the technology is reported to have demonstrated 80% accuracy in objectively diagnosing PTSD as well as differentiating subjects with and without the disorder.

The new protocol is said to have used features from quiescent segments or lowest heart rate periods.

"The findings from this research provide a significant step forward in assisting veterans by identifying and diagnosing PTSD."

The approach is expected to deliver a potentially non-invasive, automatic and objective method to monitor the progression and/or improvement of a condition.

Medibio CEO Jack Cosentino said: “The findings from this research provide a significant step forward in assisting veterans by identifying and diagnosing PTSD.

“This technology will also assist in the direct benefit for screening, diagnosing and treating mental illness among active military service personnel.”

As part of an ongoing initiative by the university and the firm, the research was commenced in January this year to expand the use of the new technology from depression to PTSD classification.

Under a licence agreement between the parties, Medibio holds an exclusive option and worldwide rights to commercialise new discoveries that are based on the PTSD technology.