Prevencio develops new blood test to detect risk of cardiac disorders


Diagnostic tests provider Prevencio has developed a new multi-protein blood test HART CVE, in collaboration with Massachusetts General Hospital, to detect risk the of heart attack, stroke or cardiovascular death.

A study conducted to validate the test showed that it accurately identifies the risk of these cardiac disorders compared to commonly-used risk factors.

The new blood test was examined for its ability to detect one-year risk of having a heart attack, stroke, or cardiovascular death in more than 900 subjects.

"It was found that the test predicted with 97% accuracy (negative predictive value) that a low-risk patient would not have a heart attack or major cardiac event within one year."

Prevencio president and chief executive officer Rhonda Rhyne said: “Prevencio is honoured to work with Massachusetts General Hospital’s talented team of dedicated researchers to find safer, more accurate and more affordable ways to identify and treat millions of cardiac patients.

“The American Heart Association recently issued a Scientific Statement on the transformative impact of proteomics on cardiovascular health and disease, and we are pleased to be at the forefront of using multi-protein tests to improve cardiovascular care.”

It was found that the test predicted with 97% accuracy (negative predictive value) that a low-risk patient would not have a heart attack or major cardiac event within one year, when the test score was categorised into low-risk and high-risk.

According to the study's principal investigator James Januzzi, the test can be useful for those patients with suspected or known stable heart disease, for which there are very few prognostic risk models.

Prevencio is also developing another multi-protein blood test HART CAD to diagnose obstruction of the coronary arteries.

With plans to conduct regulatory trials next year and submit for European and FDA approvals in 2018-2019, it is expected that the HART CVE and HART CAD tests will be available for use by 2019.