Haemonetics has been granted a patent for a method of collecting plasma. The method involves determining the weight and hematocrit of a donor, withdrawing blood from the donor through a venous-access device and a draw line, introducing anticoagulant into the withdrawn blood, separating the blood into a plasma component and a second blood component, and collecting the plasma component into a plasma collection container. The method also includes calculating the volume of anticoagulant in the collected plasma component and the volume of pure plasma collected, based on the calculated volume of anticoagulant. The process continues until a target volume of pure plasma is collected. GlobalData’s report on Haemonetics gives a 360-degree view of the company including its patenting strategy. Buy the report here.

Smarter leaders trust GlobalData

Report-cover

Premium Insights Haemonetics Corp - Company Profile

Buy the Report

Premium Insights

The gold standard of business intelligence.

Find out more

According to GlobalData’s company profile on Haemonetics, Glucose monitoring wearbles was a key innovation area identified from patents. Haemonetics's grant share as of September 2023 was 53%. Grant share is based on the ratio of number of grants to total number of patents.

Method for collecting plasma using a blood component separation device

Source: United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). Credit: Haemonetics Corp

A recently granted patent (Publication Number: US11738124B2) describes a method and system for collecting plasma from a donor. The method involves several steps, including determining the weight and hematocrit of the donor, inserting a venous-access device, withdrawing whole blood from the donor, introducing anticoagulant into the withdrawn blood, separating the blood into plasma and other components, collecting the plasma in a separate container, and calculating the volume of anticoagulant and pure plasma collected. The process continues until a target volume of pure plasma is reached.

The patent also includes additional features, such as determining the change in volume within the anticoagulant container, determining the volume of anticoagulant based on the number of rotations of an anticoagulant pump, and monitoring the volume or weight of the collected plasma component. These additional features help ensure accurate measurements and control throughout the collection process.

The system described in the patent includes a venous-access device, a blood component separation device, a blood draw line, an anticoagulant line, and a controller. The controller is responsible for controlling the operation of the blood component separation device and the blood draw pump, as well as calculating the volume of anticoagulant and pure plasma collected. The system may also include sensors, such as an anticoagulant source weight sensor, an optical sensor on the blood component separation device, and a plasma container weight sensor, to monitor various parameters and ensure accurate measurements.

Overall, this patent provides a detailed method and system for collecting plasma from a donor, with various features and measurements to ensure accuracy and control. The technology described in the patent could potentially be used in medical facilities or blood banks for efficient and reliable plasma collection.

To know more about GlobalData’s detailed insights on Haemonetics, buy the report here.

Premium Insights

From

The gold standard of business intelligence.

Blending expert knowledge with cutting-edge technology, GlobalData’s unrivalled proprietary data will enable you to decode what’s happening in your market. You can make better informed decisions and gain a future-proof advantage over your competitors.

GlobalData

GlobalData, the leading provider of industry intelligence, provided the underlying data, research, and analysis used to produce this article.

GlobalData Patent Analytics tracks bibliographic data, legal events data, point in time patent ownerships, and backward and forward citations from global patenting offices. Textual analysis and official patent classifications are used to group patents into key thematic areas and link them to specific companies across the world’s largest industries.