Medical Technology – Issue 5

17 January 2018 (Last Updated January 17th, 2018 11:30)

In this issue: Innovations in cochlear implants, a new method to grow bone from stem cells, insights into early stage med tech funding, and all the latest comment and analysis from GlobalData’s healthcare experts.

Medical Technology – Issue 5

Medical Technology now available on all devices! Read it here for free in the web browser of your computer, tablet or smartphone.

MED-EL recently launched what it calls the world’s first cochlear implant powered by wireless charging, while Cochlear has teamed with Apple to make the first “made for iPhone” cochlear implants using a sound processor that allows direct streaming from Apple devices. We take a look at the technology behind these new products and find out how hearing aids are set to benefit from innovations in accessibility.

We also review a recent breakthrough which has enabled researchers to grow bone from human stem cells and find out what it could mean for the potential culture of cellularised bone grafts, learn how ‘disruptive’ technology start-ups can help to drive innovation in the NHS, and hear from Silicon Valley Bank about the ins and outs of funding early stage medical technology development.

As always, we also round up the latest news from the medical device industry and get comment and analysis from GlboalData’s healthcare analysts, including a recap and review of business, market and product developments from 2017.

In this issue

 

Wireless Charging and iPhone Streaming: Innovations for Cochlear Implants

Innovations in accessibility, often achieved first in the mobile tech space, are filtering into the medical sector and hearing aids are one area set to benefit. Elly Earls looks at a cochlear implant powered by wireless charging and the world’s first ‘made for iPhone’ sound processor.

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Nanokicking: A New Method to Grow Bone from Stem Cells

A group of scientists in Scotland have found that giving stem cells a miniscule, ultra-precise ‘kick’ can turn them into bone cells. Elly Earls finds out more about the technology’s applications for healing bone fractures.

Read more.

Funding Med Tech Innovation from the Ground Up

The Silicon Valley Bank supports medical startups and established firms with a growing focus on digital health technologies and machine learning applications. Abi Millar finds out more from managing director of life sciences & healthcare Nooman Haque.

Read more.

Positive Disruption: Encouraging Innovation in the NHS

The NHS is ripe for disruption, offering innovative companies a variety of areas where they can make a difference. Anne Blackwood, CEO at medical technology innovation hub Health Enterprise East, explains how start-ups can drive innovation in the NHS.

Read more.

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The UK’s National Measurement Institute recently launched the 3D OrbiSIMS, an innovative molecular imaging instrument developed with GSK which could help to determine drug failures earlier in the trial process. We investigate the potential of the instrument, which allows for the detection of drugs and metabolites with sub-cellular resolution, helping researchers determine the precise distribution of a medicine and the effect it has within a cell.

We also take a look at a new power system for medical devices developed by Cambridge Consultants which promises flexible, efficient and safe wireless power transfer to devices inside the body without precise alignment with the implant, and regardless of the size and body shape of the patient. Plus, we find out how companies can meet changing regulatory requirements affecting data management, such as the upcoming ISO IDMP standards and new FDA CMC guidance.

As always, we also round up the latest news from the medical device industry, and get comment and analysis from GlobalData’s healthcare analysts on market dynamics, product innovation, regional developments and regulatory issues.