Biocartis and AstraZeneca partner on lung cancer diagnostics
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Biocartis and AstraZeneca partner on lung cancer diagnostics

30 Nov 2018 (Last Updated November 30th, 2018 10:36)

Molecular diagnostics company Biocartis Group has signed an agreement with AstraZeneca to obtain faster lung cancer molecular diagnostic biomarker results in Europe.

Biocartis and AstraZeneca partner on lung cancer diagnostics
Biocartis and AstraZeneca will conduct a lung cancer study with Biocartis’s Idylla EGFR Mutation Test in selected countries in Europe. Credit: James Heilman, MD.

Molecular diagnostics company Biocartis Group has signed an agreement with AstraZeneca to obtain faster lung cancer molecular diagnostic biomarker results in Europe.

Under the terms of the agreement, the companies will conduct a prospective lung cancer study with Biocartis’s Idylla EGFR Mutation Test (CE-IVD) in selected countries in Europe.

The study will be initiated at more than 12 sites in Belgium, France, Germany and Italy.

“Under the terms of the agreement, the companies will conduct a prospective lung cancer study with Biocartis’s Idylla EGFR Mutation Test (CE-IVD) in selected countries in Europe.”

It is aimed at determining how the Idylla platform features can overcome the existing complexity and accelerate diagnostics for lung cancer patients by delivering accurate biomarker results.

Biocartis Group CEO Herman Verrelst said: “We are very excited to be collaborating with AstraZeneca in the area of lung cancer.

“With this prospective study, we expect to once again demonstrate the positive impact of delivering highly accurate biomarker results in a fast and easy way, to the benefit of the patients.

“For Biocartis, this is yet another important collaboration to support the further roll-out of our Idylla platform.”

Lung cancers account for 13% of all cancer types and 85% of lung cancers are non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC).

Mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor, which occur in 10-15% of NSCLC patients in the US and the EU, and 30-40% of NSCLC patients in Asia, are the driving factors for many of these cancers.

With molecular testing of lung cancer samples, which is currently available, obtaining high-quality tissue samples is difficult and turns out to be a complex process.