Australia invests in artificial intelligence for medical imaging

3 August 2018 (Last Updated November 22nd, 2018 11:29)

The Australian Government has given a grant to the Sydney Neuroimaging Analysis Centre (SNAC) for the development of new medical imaging techniques based on artificial intelligence.

Australia invests in artificial intelligence for medical imaging
New artificial intelligence algorithms to improve diagnostic neuroimaging. Credit: The University of Sydney.

The Australian Government has given a grant to the Sydney Neuroimaging Analysis Centre (SNAC) for the development of new medical imaging techniques based on artificial intelligence.

SNAC will utilise the $2.36m ($1.74m) funding to collaborate with the University of Sydney’s Brain and Mind Centre on diagnostic imaging to detect brain disorders such as multiple sclerosis and dementia.

Over a period of three years, the team will develop an artificial intelligence platform and neuroimaging algorithms backed by deep learning artificial neural networks.

“The new artificial intelligence-based algorithms will be designed for integration into routine clinical radiology workflows in order to enhance productivity, reporting accuracy and identify any important imaging abnormalities.”

The Brain and Mind Centre project partners, including Sydney Neuroimaging Analysis Centre (SNAC) and the I-MED Radiology Network, have invested an additional $2.8m ($2.07m).

Brain and Mind Centre neurology professor Michael Barnett said: “We aim to transform the delivery of neuro-radiology services across Australia.

“We plan to do this by developing novel, automated algorithms that aid in both the diagnosis and monitoring of brain diseases using magnetic resonance images and CT scans.”

According to the University of Sydney, around 4% of medical images are misinterpreted by clinicians.

The new artificial intelligence-based algorithms will be designed for integration into routine clinical radiology workflows in order to enhance productivity, reporting accuracy and identify any important imaging abnormalities.

Australian radiology provider I-MED will supply the majority of the de-identified imaging and reporting data required to develop and validate the algorithms.

University of Sydney deputy vice-chancellor Duncan Ivison said: “I commend the government and project partners for funding this effort to improve diagnostic neuro-imaging for the benefit of people with degenerative brain disorders.”