One-year data from Boston Scientific‘s SOLIS trial demonstrates that its WaveWriter Alpha Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) system can reduce pain in chronic pain patients by 50%.

The results were announced as part of the North American Neuromodulation Society Meeting (NANS) in Las Vegas and were released alongside updates on two other studies being carried out using Boston Scientific’s SCS system in different indications.

Data from the trial showed that 85% of patients who declared a drop in pain reported a greater ability to take part in daily activities and a 25-point improvement in disability as measured by the Oswestry Disability Index.

Jim Cassidy, president of neuromodulation at Boston Scientific, said: “Continued positive results from the SOLIS study illustrate the need for early and effective pain treatment when just the standard of care is not enough.

“Backed by consistently strong clinical evidence, our transformative pain management solutions help individualize care and improve the quality of life for the many people living with chronic pain today.”

Boston Scientfic’s study: Global, multicenter study of prospectively-enrolled patients utilizing SCS for Painful-Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy, itself saw 81% of patients similarly reporting a 50% drop in pain.

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By GlobalData

At the same time the company’s FAST Therapy study, a multiple prospective and real-world study taking place across Europe and the United States similarly saw 88% of SCS patients reporting 50% or greater pain relief.

GlobalData’s Medical Device Centre details how there are as many as 79 spinal cord stimulator devices currently in the development pipeline, with 54 of those in clinical development. The market is largely dominated by a back-and-forth between Boston Scientific and its US-based competitor, Medtronic.

The news follows after Boston Scientific was able to further extend its pain mitigation efforts, acquiring Intercept Intraosseous Nerve Ablation System developer, Relievant Medsystems for an upfront cash payment of $850m.

Elsewhere in the field of neurostimulation, Dutch competitor Onward Medical has started a Netherlands-based clinical feasibility study to assess its ARC-IM neurostimulator’s ability to improve haemodynamic instability in spinal cord injury patients.