Smart manufacturing company cuts costs for essential Covid-19 devices

Chloe Kent 19 March 2020 (Last Updated March 20th, 2020 14:15)

Smart manufacturing company Bright Machines has announced it will enable no-cost automation for up to a year for the manufacturing of medical devices essential to the treatment of Covid-19.

Smart manufacturing company cuts costs for essential Covid-19 devices
Access to testing kits and an adequate supply of treatment resources for devices like ventilators and respirators is now critical. Credit: Bright Machines

Smart manufacturing company Bright Machines has announced it will enable no-cost automation for up to a year for the manufacturing of medical devices essential to the treatment of Covid-19.

Access to testing kits and an adequate supply of treatment resources for devices like ventilators and respirators is now critical. In the wake of the global Covid-19 crisis, medical device companies will now be able to use a Bright Machines Microfactory for free to expedite the production of these kinds of devices for up to 12 months.

Bright Machines Microfactories help manufacturers scale up production using modular automation, which is less reliant on human operators than a traditional assembly and inspection process.

The company also offers Bright Machines Select, a microfactory-as-a-service model which offers Software Defined Manufacturing to manufacturers while allowing them to bypass the upfront costs associated with traditional automation equipment purchasing.

Bright Machines CEO Amar Hanspal said: “As a leader of an organization that has employees in the US, Europe and Asia, many of whom were the first to get impacted by the disease and others who are now in mandatory shelter-in-place directives, I can’t help but to feel that where we can, we must help be a part of the solution.

“The most valuable and timely contribution Bright Machines can offer is removing barriers to quickly get these critical products into the hands of as many healthcare providers throughout the world as possible. And, as the part of the supply chain helping to manufacture products like these, it is our responsibility to help do so.”

The company believes that manufacturers that would otherwise have been constrained by cost, labour shortages or slow production cycles may now be better able to meet increased demand in the healthcare sector.

Shortages of ventilator valves in Italy have already spurred action from the business community, as local 3D printing companies stepped in to manufacture replacements for patients in intensive care.