General Electric and DARPA partner for diabetes research project

7 September 2018 (Last Updated November 22nd, 2018 11:24)

General Electric (GE) has collaborated with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) on a $2.9m research project to develop non-drug treatments for diabetes.

General Electric and DARPA partner for diabetes research project
GE Global Research and DARPA will study new treatments for diabetes. Credit: General Electric.

General Electric (GE) has collaborated with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) on a $2.9m research project to develop non-drug treatments for diabetes.

During the three-year research programme, GE Bioelectronic scientists who specialise in bioelectronic medicine will explore new methods to treat diabetes by using electronic devices.

They will work on non-invasive, stimulation technique technology that would reverse or treat diabetes.

“During the three-year research programme, GE Bioelectronic scientists who specialise in bioelectronic medicine will explore new methods to treat diabetes by using electronic devices.”

The devices can stimulate metabolic biosystems and produce drug-like effects.

According to the company, the research team hopes to prevent the onset of metabolic dysfunction related to the onset of diabetes as well as safely test and apply this technology in the clinic.

GE global research biologist Victoria Cotero said: “Today’s drug treatments and monitoring methods for diabetes can be uncomfortable and time-consuming, and create side-effects for patients.

“Our project with DARPA aims to find a better alternative that treats diabetes with non-invasive medical devices without the side effects associated with drug treatments.”

GE Bioelectronic medicine team will work on the project from GE’s global research centre in Upstate New York.

GE biomedical engineer and principal investigator of the DARPA project Chris Puleo said: “Given GE’s decades of innovation in medical imaging modalities, our growing body of research and published work in biomedical research and our considerable network of academic and clinical collaborators, GE Global Research is in a unique position to help drive the emerging field of non-invasive neuromodulation and enable revolutionary new treatments for diabetes and other chronic diseases.”

Recently, GE’s team also participated in research by Feinstein Institute for Medical Research recently focused on reading and interpreting nerve signals in the body.