Global Kinetics gets funds to support wearable Parkinson’s device

13 April 2018 (Last Updated April 13th, 2018 12:18)

Australia-based medical technology firm Global Kinetics has secured funding from various local and international organisations to support the use of its wearable technology for the monitoring and management of Parkinson’s disease (PD).

Australia-based medical technology firm Global Kinetics has secured funding from various local and international organisations to support the use of its wearable technology for the monitoring and management of Parkinson’s disease (PD).

The company designed the Parkinson’s KinetiGraph (PKG) device to offer objective metrics and target ranges to assess or manage the disease.

About $7.7m ($5.97) has been invested in the commercialisation of PKG by the Australian Federal Government’s Biomedical Translation Fund, reported the Australian Financial Review.

“The company designed the Parkinson’s KinetiGraph (PKG) device to offer objective metrics and target ranges to assess or manage the disease.”

The Michael J Fox Foundation in the US and Shake It Up Australia Foundation will together provide $250,000, while Parkinson’s Victoria has announced $100,000.

Global Kinetics will use these grants for a global, randomised and controlled clinical trial being conducted to assess the implementation of target ranges obtained from PKG to enable treatment decisions and its ability to improve patient outcomes.

The 18-month Treat-to-Target trial is underway at various centres in Australia, with plans to extend to the US and European sites over the coming months. A total of 225 patients will be enrolled in the study.

Global Kinetics expects to report interim results from the trial by December this year.

Global Kinetics CEO John Schellhorn said: “To date, Global Kinetics has provided decision support information to clinicians across 17 countries with more than three million hours of clinical data from our PKG wearable device.

“However, the defining feature of our technology is that it is already used every day to help people with Parkinson’s. Target ranges are the next evolution in the use of wearables to extend the benefits of measurement to people with Parkinson’s who have the greatest need for support.”