Google to take over DeepMind’s health technology division

14 November 2018 (Last Updated November 22nd, 2018 11:31)

Tech giant Google has announced plans to absorb its sister company DeepMind’s health technology unit into its newly-formed health subsidiary.

Google to take over DeepMind’s health technology division
Streams team at DeepMind to join Google Health. Credit: bubbletea1.

Tech giant Google has announced plans to absorb its sister company DeepMind’s health technology unit into its newly-formed health subsidiary.

The team at DeepMind Health that developed Streams patient care app will be joining Google Health, which is led by CEO David Feinberg.

Formed in 2010, DeepMind was acquired by Google in 2014. The technology company was later made a part of Google’s parent organisation Alphabet.

“The team at DeepMind Health that developed Streams patient care app will be joining Google Health, which is led by CEO David Feinberg.”

Streams is a mobile app designed to aid doctors and nurses in providing better care for patients. It sends immediate notifications to clinicians in case a patient deteriorates.

Currently, the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust is using the mobile health app. The Streams team will now work with Google to expand the app’s use as an AI-powered assistant to doctors and nurses.

The team will remain in London and will be led by former NHS surgeon and researcher Dr Dominic King.

In a blog post, DeepMind said: “We’re fully committed to all our NHS partners, and to delivering on our current projects and more. We’ll be working closely with them as we plan for the team’s transition, and information governance and safety remain our top priorities.

“Patient data remains under our partners’ strict control, and all decisions about its use will continue to lie with them.”

DeepMind primarily focuses on healthcare AI research. A study showed that the company’s AI system can quickly and accurately identify more than 50 eye disorders using routine medical scans.

In addition, the company’s healthcare projects include the use of deep learning to plan cancer radiotherapy treatment in seconds and detect patient deterioration from electronic records.

DeepMind added: “Over the coming years, we expect AI to help scientists make transformative advances on problems ranging from protein folding to image analysis, potentially improving medical diagnosis, drug discovery and much more.

“We’re excited to play our part in that journey both at DeepMind and at Google, in the service of patients and clinicians around the world.”