Haemoglobin spray could cut NHS chronic wound care costs, study finds

Chloe Kent 13 December 2019 (Last Updated December 13th, 2019 11:45)

An evaluation of 100 patients at an NHS clinic in the UK has demonstrated savings in chronic would care costs with the use of Granulox, a haemoglobin spray that binds oxygen from the atmosphere and diffuses it into the wound to promote faster healing.

Haemoglobin spray could cut NHS chronic wound care costs, study finds
At 20 weeks, 90% of wounds treated with Granulox had healed, while half of the patients in the control group were still not healed six months on. Credit: Shutterstock

An evaluation of 100 patients at an NHS clinic in the UK has demonstrated savings in chronic would care costs with the use of Granulox, a haemoglobin spray that binds oxygen from the atmosphere and diffuses it into the wound to promote faster healing.

Designed to be used as adjunct to standard wound care therapy, Granulox, designed by Swedish-headquartered medical products firm Mölnlycke as an adjunct to standard wound care therapy, could pay for itself in terms of cost savings, according to a study published in the Journal of Wound Care.

Half of the patients in the study were treated with Granulox as part of their wound care regimen while the other half completed traditional dressing changes over 26 weeks. Their wound healing process was compared against 50 consecutive retrospective controls treated with traditional dressing changes by healthcare professionals in the same clinic, a year before the introduction of Granulox.

These wounds included pressure ulcers, leg ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers, burns, and surgical and trauma wounds.

A break-even analysis of the clinical results demonstrated that at eight weeks enough dressing costs are saved to pay for treatment with Granulox. There was an average saving of £82 on dressing per patient at 26 weeks, with the average cost of treatment with Granulox clocking in at £140 compared to £221 for patients in the control group.

At 20 weeks, 90% of wounds treated with Granulox had healed, while half of the patients in the control group were still not healed six months on.

Scotland’s national diabetes foot coordinator Dr Duncan Stang said: “The impact of non-healing wounds on a patient’s quality of life can be devastating. The ability to help these patients without a financial burden to the NHS, and in fact demonstrated cost savings, is an invaluable opportunity.

“The analysis does demonstrate cost-effectiveness – which is excellent – and what is also really interesting about this work is the reduced healing times, benefitting patients and of course healthcare teams who are working in an ever-stretched NHS, particularly in wound care.”