MedFluid develops antibiotic screening platform for disease detection

18 January 2021 (Last Updated January 18th, 2021 16:23)

MedFluid has developed fAST, a new personalised antibiotic screening platform that can automate both rapid genotype and phenotype detection of bacteria.

MedFluid develops antibiotic screening platform for disease detection
MedFluid was selected for Taiwan Tech Arena’s (TTA) 2019 Prototyping Program. Credit: MedFluid.

MedFluid has developed fAST, a new personalised antibiotic screening platform that can automate both rapid genotype and phenotype detection of bacteria.

fAST is a combination of automated bacteria identification and multiple antibiotics test and can identify bacteria within 1.5 hours and complete the multiple antibiotics combination within five hours.

The company used microfluidics as a core technology in the development of the fAST in vitro diagnostic (IVD) platform. The test supports the precision medicine of antibiotics, targeting the emergence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

MedFluid founder and Microfluidics R&D head Bon Lee said: “We are committed to developing microfluidic platforms for rapid detection and screening tools used in disease diagnosis and to supporting precise medical prescriptions to improve the health and well-being of patients. We are committed to optimising the quality of patient-specific medications for infectious disease.

“We are the fastest first-in-class system on the market that can optimise three different kinds of antibiotic combinations, providing clinicians with accurate and personalised results.”

The fAST platform has three features, which are sensitivity, rapidity and flexibility. Its sensitivity enables users to complete antimicrobial susceptibility test (AST) with only 1% of the samples required by existing methods.

Detection time had also been reduced from the traditional 24 hours to five hours.

Furthermore, fAST enables doctors to conduct personalised tests, allowing for a combination of up to three different kinds of antibiotics at once.

Lee noted that according to the World Health Organization (WHO) antimicrobial resistance was one of the ten threats to global health in 2019.

Lee further added: “Global research shows that 50% usage of antibiotics is inappropriate, and empirical treatment is one of the main causes.”