Medtronic begins study for spinal cord stimulation programming

11 January 2018 (Last Updated January 11th, 2018 10:36)

Medtronic has started enrolment in the Vectors Post Market Clinical Study to evaluate optimised spinal cord stimulation (SCS) programming for standardised delivery of treatment.

Medtronic has started enrolment in the Vectors Post Market Clinical Study to evaluate optimised spinal cord stimulation (SCS) programming for standardised delivery of treatment.

The study will recruit patients suffering from chronic intractable pain and undergoing SCS treatment that is managed using the Evolve workflow.

Evolve, which is powered by Medtronic SCS systems such as implantable Intellis neurostimulator, standardises guidance for balancing high and low-dose therapy settings to aid optimised treatment.

The prospective, multi-centre Vectors study will investigate SCS’ long-term efficacy and impact on quality of life in around 175 subjects at up to 25 US sites.

The study also aims to validate the Evolve workflow by assessing the effectiveness and potential benefits for patients having access to high and low-dose stimulation modalities.

“This data may help us expand our ability to help people struggling with chronic intractable pain.”

Vectors study primary investigator John Hathaway said: “The Vectors study will generate meaningful data about the use of the Evolve workflow and will help further physicians’ understanding of how to use this simple, versatile approach to enable effective, long-term pain relief with SCS.

“Knowing how to best use non-opioid treatment options like the Intellis SCS platform is more important than ever, and this data may help us expand our ability to help people struggling with chronic intractable pain.”

Medtronic’s neurostimulation therapy for chronic intractable pain involves implantation of a medical device to deliver mild electrical impulses for blocking transmission of pain signals to the brain.

According to the data from different clinical trials, SCS offers better pain relief compared to re-operation and standard medical management.