NeuroPace reports positive data from RNS System study

13 May 2019 (Last Updated May 13th, 2019 10:48)

Medical technology firm NeuroPace has announced long-term data from the clinical study of its RNS System to treat patients suffering from refractory epilepsy.

NeuroPace reports positive data from RNS System study
Next-Gen RNS System is a closed loop brain-responsive neurostimulation device. Credit: NeuroPace, Inc.

Medical technology firm NeuroPace has announced long-term data from the clinical study of its RNS System to treat patients suffering from refractory epilepsy.

Findings showed that the neuromodulation device significantly decreased seizure frequency, where one out of three patients experienced 90% or more reduction in the frequency at nine years.

The long-term study involved 256 patients across 33 epilepsy centres.

According to the data, median seizure reduction across all patients was observed to be 75% at nine years. The results also demonstrated improved quality of life, including improved memory and cognition, in patients treated with the RNS System.

Study principal investigator Dileep Nair said: “These nine-year results demonstrate compelling long-term seizure reduction in patients treated with the RNS System.

“Through the body of information provided by RNS System, we are gaining a better understanding of the human brain – both generally, and on an individual level. It is exciting to consider how this knowledge might be used to improve the treatment of brain disorders.”

“With the use of advanced analytical techniques, the RNS System provides a window into the location, frequency, and triggers of an individual’s seizures.”

RNS System leverages brain-computer interface technology to treat patients with refractory focal seizures.

Neural data captured by the device is said to offer better insights into an individual’s seizures, in turn enabling personalised care for patients.

A retrospective analysis of the RNS System was performed using machine and deep learning algorithms in order determine the device’s potential to identify objective biomarkers in the brain.

NeuroPace chief medical officer Martha Morrell said: “Electrographic data captured by the RNS System is the single largest collection of ambulatory brain recordings in the world.

“With the use of advanced analytical techniques, the RNS System provides a window into the location, frequency, and triggers of an individual’s seizures. These insights have the potential to lead to the treatment of other brain disorders that affect millions of people worldwide.”

Launched in June last year, RNS System comprises a neurostimulator, leads placed at the seizure foci, a remote monitor for patients to upload data, and a RNS Tablet and Patient Data Management System (PDMS) for physicians.

Currently, NeuroPace scientists are using artificial intelligence and machine learning to analyse electrocorticographic recordings for developing algorithms to optimise and individualise patient care.