Antibe Therapeutics launches new bone graft substitute

31 January 2017 (Last Updated January 31st, 2017 18:30)

Citagenix, a division of Canada-based Antibe Therapeutics has launched a new bone graft substitute PentOS OI Max for oral and maxillofacial surgery, expanding its current line of PentOS OI bone grafts.

Citagenix, a division of Canada-based Antibe Therapeutics has launched a new bone graft substitute PentOS OI Max for oral and maxillofacial surgery, expanding its current line of PentOS OI bone grafts.

The new bone graft substitute is an inductive collagen matrix that can be combined with the clinician’s choice of patient derived concentrates such as stem cells and blood components.

The firm has demonstrated osteoinductivity for each lot of grafts in both in-vivo and in-vitro assays using independent laboratories.

"The firm has demonstrated osteoinductivity for each lot of grafts in both in-vivo and in-vitro assays using independent laboratories."

Antibe chief executive officer Dan Legault said: “Citagenix continues to augment its portfolio with the addition of high-quality products that support optimal patient outcomes at a competitive price point.

“Being the portfolio-of-choice for dentists and oromaxillofacial surgeons is important to our global growth strategy and is supported by an active business development funnel.”

The in-vitro testing showed that the levels of a naturally occurring bone growth factor called bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) were up to 40-times higher, when compared to the control.

These tests also demonstrated better cell viability and proliferation.

In-vivo testing of the graft demonstrated the presence of all five elements of bone formation chondrocytes, osteocytes, bone marrow cells, cartilage, and new bone.

The firm intends to directly distribute the new bone graft substitute in Canada, while its distribution partners will distribute in other countries.

Antibe designs medicines for pain and inflammation with its technology that involves linking a hydrogen sulfide-releasing molecule to an existing drug to develop a patented, improved medicine.