Baxter upgrades AK 98 hemodialysis system for broader treatment

21 May 2017 (Last Updated November 26th, 2018 11:09)

US-based healthcare firm Baxter International has introduced the upgraded version of its AK 98 hemodialysis (HD) system to offer more treatment options.

US-based healthcare firm Baxter International has introduced the upgraded version of its AK 98 hemodialysis (HD) system to offer more treatment options.

The new device features two-way IT connectivity, options to meet the needs of low-weight patients, as well as functions for easy treatment set-up and decreased downtime between sessions.

The system can deliver HDx enabled by THERANOVA dialyser, which is said to also target large middle molecules that are not eliminated by standard dialysis treatments.

Available in Europe, Australia and New Zealand, the therapy can be integrated into current healthcare infrastructure.

Baxter Chronic Renal general manager Laura Angelini said: “We designed our new AK 98 system specifically to help dialysis providers minimise the operational challenges associated with hemodialysis.

“Enhanced features such as two-way IT connectivity and an easy-to-use interface were designed to eliminate time spent manually handling documents and improve clinical workflows.”

"Enhanced features such as two-way IT connectivity and an easy-to-use interface were designed to eliminate time spent manually handling documents and improve clinical workflows."

The new AK 98 system provides better clinic and treatment information management and integration by allowing connection to the dialysis provider’s central IT network.

The HD prescription is sent from the provider’s network to the system during the treatment set-up.

After the treatment is complete, the data is transmitted back to the provider’s network in encrypted form for security and storage purposes. Later, the data is removed from the AK 98.

The system includes new blood lines designed to work with the firm’s small dialysers for treating low weight patients, who require specialised equipment due to lower blood volumes.

Launched in 2015, the system is available in several countries across Asia, Europe and Latin America.