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US-based biomedical laboratory instruments maker Beckman Coulter has installed the first DxH 500 haematology analyser in the University of Chester’s Institute of Medicine on the Countess of Chester Health Park, UK.

The DxH 500 is a fully automated haematology analyser suited for use in clinics, research and point–of-care.

The device will be used to conduct post-graduate clinical research in collaboration with the Countess of Chester Hospital.

The DxH 500 has been specifically designed to be used for low-volume workloads up to 60 samples / hour.

It is intuitive and highly compact while offering a full blood count with a full five-part white blood cell differential.

The device is suitable for use on paediatric and geriatric patients, who are unable to provide samples of larger quantity, as it requires 12µL (a finger-prick or venous sample) of blood to provide an accurate results.

Additionally, re-tests can be conducted without requiring another sample, thereby making it ideal for routine or research purposes.

University of Chester’s Institute of Medicine lab technician Jasmine Stanley-Ahmed said: “We needed an analyser that was reliable and simple to use by research students, while still able to provide comprehensive results for in-depth clinical research projects using both whole blood and cell separations.

“As our experience with Beckman Coulter analysers has been so good, when we heard of the launch of the DxH 500, we were confident enough to buy it unseen.

"We are especially pleased that, as well as being compact, it offers full five-part diff, which enables even more scope for our research."

“We are especially pleased that, as well as being compact, it offers full five-part diff, which enables even more scope for our research.”

The 27cm system is fitted with an inbuilt touchscreen monitor that can be placed at any location requiring less space.

The DxH 500 requires two analytical reagents and a cleaner, using 50% less reagent and can perform a large number of tests using a single reagent bottle. Reagents are non-toxic which saves on disposal costs and meet regulatory compliance standards.