BMS and Nordic Bioscience partner to develop biomarker technology for fibrotic diseases

17 April 2017 (Last Updated April 17th, 2017 18:30)

US-based biopharmaceutical company Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS) has entered a collaboration agreement with Danish biotech firm Nordic Bioscience to develop biomarker technology to detect fibrotic diseases.

US-based biopharmaceutical company Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS) has entered into a collaboration agreement with Danish biotech firm Nordic Bioscience for developing new biomarker technology to detect fibrotic diseases.

The biomarker technology is expected to support the diagnosis and monitoring of fibrotic diseases, including non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).

Under the agreement, the companies will develop diagnostics and translational biomarkers for NASH assessment in pre-clinical models of fibrotic disorders, as well as in clinical settings. 

BMS cardiovascular, fibrosis and immunoscience development head Mike Burgess said: “Addressing the significant need for better diagnostic and monitoring tools in fibrotic diseases is a key element of Bristol-Myers Squibb’s fibrosis strategy to help patients suffering from these debilitating conditions.

“We continue to invest in innovative approaches to develop more precise methods to diagnose disease and monitor progression, and we are pleased to partner with Nordic Bioscience and leverage their vast experience in biomarker development.”

"Nordic Bioscience is very proud to enter into this collaboration, which will benefit the fibrosis field by advancing the research in fibrosis biomarkers for the benefit of patients."

Nordic develops, measures and validates assays for collagens, elastins and laminins as biomarkers of extracellular matrix (ECM) activity.

Nordic chief executive officer Morten Karsdal said: “There is a big unmet need in medical and drug development for simple non-invasive diagnostic, early proof of efficacy of intervention and prognostic biomarkers in the NASH field.

"Nordic Bioscience is very proud to enter into this collaboration, which will benefit the fibrosis field by advancing the research in fibrosis biomarkers for the benefit of patients."

The firm's non-invasive biomarker called C-terminal telopeptide (CTX) helps to detect osteoporosis patients who have a high rate of bone loss and a patient's response to osteoporosis therapy.