Cambridge Medical Robotics unveils Versius robotic surgery system

12 December 2016 (Last Updated December 12th, 2016 18:30)

UK-based Cambridge Medical Robotics (CMR) has unveiled its Versius robotic surgery system while providing update on its ongoing cadaveric studies.

UK-based Cambridge Medical Robotics (CMR) has unveiled its Versius robotic surgery system while providing update on its ongoing cadaveric studies.

The CMR developed Versius system features a surgeon console, modular light-weight robotic arms and a range of wristed 5mm instruments.

The robotic surgery system uses 3D high-definition imagery, which enhances flexibility, and will use force feedback to provide surgeons with life-like sensitivity.

"In the first round of trials we were able to confirm the ability of the system to perform surgery in the upper abdomen, and for colorectal and pelvic surgery."

The system has been designed to withstand obstacles which comes in the way of comprehensive adoption of robotic minimal access surgery, namely robot size, instrument size, versatility, port placement, cost and ease of use, enabling increased usage of the system and cost-comparable to manual laparoscopic surgery.

CMR medical director Mark Slack said: "Our medical advisory board members have now completed a series of simulation and cadaveric trials with the Versius system.

“In the first round of trials we were able to confirm the ability of the system to perform surgery in the upper abdomen, and for colorectal and pelvic surgery.

“In the next phase, we have progressed to the study of individual operations to further assess the capability of the system and the performance of the graspers, scissors, electrocautery and needle drivers.”

Currently, CMR is testing the ability of the Versius system to perform upper GI, gynaecological, colorectal and renal surgery in cadaveric trials.

It has already exhibited its capability to visualise and access all these surgical workspaces and to perform tissue manipulation, suturing, needle driving, electro-surgery and records being used by 32 surgeons.

CMR has engineered 20 proprietary robotic arms, out of which it has tested nine different variants of its fully articulated 5mm instruments, and conducted 11 usability studies.