Chiesi, Molecular Warehouse partner to develop diagnostic system for transplant patients

28 February 2017 (Last Updated February 28th, 2017 18:30)

Italy-based healthcare group Chiesi Pharmaceuticals has partnered with UK-based medical diagnostics start up Molecular Warehouse (MW) to create a diagnostic tool for transplant patients.

Italy-based healthcare group Chiesi Pharmaceuticals has partnered with UK-based medical diagnostics start up Molecular Warehouse (MW) to create a diagnostic tool for transplant patients.

The new diagnostic system will aim at enabling patients to remotely monitor their immunosuppressant levels.

Monitoring is required for immunosuppressant drugs such as Envarsus (tacrolimus prolonged release) taken by patients to prevent organ rejection after receiving a graft from a donor.

"The partnership is expected to result in a system that will allow patients to self-test at home, by utilising an easy to use finger-prick blood test which is connected to their smartphone."

It is to ensure that the levels of these drugs in the patient’s bloodstream are in a range that decreases the reactivity of the immune system to avoid rejection, but does not expose the patient to an increased risk of infections.

Chiesi chief executive officer Ugo Di Francesco said: “We believe MW’s innovative diagnostic system could reduce the impact of this necessary inconvenience for the patients and their doctors, while enabling even more frequent monitoring of drug levels, potentially improving patient care."

The research and developement collaboration with MW is a part of Chiesi's strategy to combine digital innovation, disease management and patient care with therapeutic options.

The partnership is expected to result in a system that will allow patients to self-test at home, by utilising an easy to use finger-prick blood test which is connected to their smartphone.

The test results will be automatically communicated with the patient's specialist.

MW chief executive officer Dr Siro Perez said: “The remote monitoring of immunosuppressants is technically a very complex problem, and we are applying cutting edge technologies from the fields of electronics, synthetic biology, and software to develop this diagnostic test."

By creating this new tool, the firms intend to eliminate the need for regular patient visits to undertake a blood test for immunosuppressants.