CiceroDx introduces new test to diagnose unexplained infertility in women

6 June 2017 (Last Updated June 6th, 2017 18:30)

US-based CiceroDx has introduced a new test panel called ReceptivaDx to diagnose causes of unexplained infertility in women.

US-based CiceroDx has introduced a new test panel called ReceptivaDx to diagnose causes of unexplained infertility in women.

With the new test, the firm intends to provide a cost-effective solution for in-vitro fertilisation (IVF) centres and healthcare providers to detect barriers to implantation such as endometriosis.

Reportedly, 15-30% of women undergoing evaluation for infertility have an unidentified cause, and endometriosis is said to be associated with around 50% of all unexplained infertility cases.

The new ReceptivaDx assay uses an endometrial biopsy sample and delivers results in three to five days, unlike existing diagnostic techniques that require the use of an expensive and invasive surgical procedure called laparoscopy to identify endometriosis.

The early identification of the condition is expected to assist IVF centres in determining appropriate treatment options, leading to an increase in success rates.

"The new ReceptivaDx assay uses an endometrial biopsy sample and delivers results in three to five days."

CiceroDx CEO Chris Jackson said: “Our mission at CiceroDx is to ensure we deliver the most accurate and cost-effective diagnostic tools for doctors and families looking for answers to unexplained infertility and implantation failure.

“Helping resolve infertility issues is just the first step. Our goal is to help clinicians better detect endometriosis in the millions of women who suffer from this silent epidemic every day.”

The firm holds the exclusive licence to distribute and market the ReceptivaDx test.

CiceroDx scientific advisor Bruce Lessey further added: “ReceptivaDx is a breakthrough test and provides a unique, enhanced screening opportunity."

The test is currently available at more than 75 IVF centres in the US, Canada, Europe and South America.