Fisher Center scientists develop 3D visualisation of brain defects causing Alzheimer’s disease

17 July 2016 (Last Updated July 17th, 2016 18:30)

Fisher Center scientists have created imaging technology that enables 3D visualisation of brain defects that cause Alzheimer's disease.

Fisher Center scientists have created imaging technology that enables 3D visualisation of brain defects that cause Alzheimer's disease.

The technology, which has been funded by the Fisher Center for Alzheimer's Research Foundation, enables visualisation of amyloid plaques, as well as other alzheimer's hallmarks, such as tau, vasculature and microglia activation, in a large volume, in an entire mouse brain with the potential of application on frozen human brain samples.

Fisher Center for Alzheimer's Research Foundation president and CEO Kent Karosen said: "We are proud that the funding we provide has resulted in innovative, never before seen imaging of what causes Alzheimer's disease.

"The Fisher Center scientists are working diligently to better understand the cause and cure of the disease and with the ability to visualise the causes of Alzheimer's, we're one step closer to a cure."

"The Fisher Center scientists are working diligently to better understand the cause and cure of the disease and with the ability to visualise the causes of Alzheimer's, we're one step closer to a cure."

The scientists, by using the iDISCO visualisation method involving targeted molecular labeling, tissue clearing and light-sheet microscopy, gained access to intact mouse brains with Alzheimer's disease and studied in detail amyloid plaque content in five major brain regions, at different ages.

They are now also able to co-visualise in 3D amyloid plaques together with two other parameters.

Volume imaging coupled with automated detection and mapping offers exact and fast quantification of plaques within the complete intact mouse brain, which is a faster and more economical alternative option to standard beta amyloid plaque labeling.


 Image: A possible 3D visualisation. Photo: courtesy of PRNewsFoto / Fisher Center for Alzheimer's.