GenomeDx and Color to offer Color Test for genetic testing in prostate cancer

15 May 2017 (Last Updated May 15th, 2017 18:30)

GenomeDx Biosciences has partnered with Color to offer Color Test for the genetic testing of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer.

GenomeDx Biosciences has partnered with Color to offer Color Test for the genetic testing of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer.

Color Test is a hereditary cancer risk test designed to analyse 30 genes that impact common hereditary cancers such as prostate, breast, ovarian, colorectal, pancreatic, uterine, melanoma and stomach cancers.

The purpose of the test is to aid prostate cancer patients in understanding the disease’s hereditary factors and the possibility of development in their family members.

GenomeDx chief executive officer Doug Dolginow said: "The collaboration with Color is consistent with GenomeDx's goal to provide the best genomic and genetic solutions for patients afflicted with prostate cancer. 

"Data from the Color Test will be added to GenomeDx's Decipher GRID research platform, aiding our research activities to discover and develop future cancer solutions."

“Expanding our product offering with this hereditary cancer risk genetic test makes it easier for patients to access information about inherited risk for their families.

“Data from the Color Test will be added to GenomeDx's Decipher GRID research platform, aiding our research activities to discover and develop future cancer solutions."

Decipher genomics resource information database (GRID) is a platform for thousands of tumours’ genomic profiles obtained from urological cancer patients.

Color chief executive officer and co-founder Othman Laraki said: "GenomeDx's Decipher tests are an important tool for physicians and patients in the prostate cancer market, and we look forward to partnering with one of the scientific leaders in the field."

By determining the level of risk for certain types of the disease, the Color Test is also intended to help men with a relative diagnosed with hereditary prostate cancer.