J&J’s DePuy Synthes takes over TRS’ 3D printing technology for bone defects

23 April 2017 (Last Updated April 23rd, 2017 18:30)

Johnson and Johnson (J&J) company DePuy Synthes Products has purchased 3D printing technology from Tissue Regeneration Systems (TRS) to treat bone defects.

Johnson and Johnson (J&J) company DePuy Synthes Products has purchased 3D printing technology from Tissue Regeneration Systems (TRS) to treat bone defects.

Financial details of the acquisition have not been revealed.

DePuy Synthes will use the 3D printing technology to create patient-specific, bioresorbable implants that are coated with minerals to support bone healing in case of orthopaedic and craniomaxillofacial deformities, and injuries.

The technology comes with a potential to individualise healthcare solutions in trauma platform.

J&J has entered more than 50 strategic alliances to use 3D printing methods for the development of patient-specific healthcare solutions to allow enhanced clinical outcomes.

DePuy Synthes company group chairman Ciro Römer said: "We are systematically investing in building a pipeline of 3D-printed products.

"The TRS technology, which will be added to the DePuy Synthes Trauma Platform, is the latest example of how we are working towards developing next-generation technologies that transform the delivery of health care with individualised solutions for patients."

In 2014, DePuy Synthes started working with TRS through J&J Innovation.

"The TRS technology is the latest example of how we are working towards developing next-generation technologies that transform the delivery of healthcare with individualised solutions for patients."

J&J Innovation identifies and invests in new collaborations at all stages of development in medical device, consumer healthcare and pharmaceutical sectors.

J&J Innovation global head Robert Urban said: "The acquisition of the TRS technology by DePuy Synthes is testament to our ability to identify and work collaboratively with promising early-stage companies and entrepreneurs to accelerate bringing innovative new products to the market.

"We are excited at the potential this technology holds to help improve patient outcomes."

Founded in 2008, TRS commercialises skeletal reconstruction and bone regeneration technology based on research conducted by the University of Michigan and the University of Wisconsin.