Lightpoint Medical and University of Arizona to develop Beta Emission Tomography

17 May 2016 (Last Updated May 17th, 2016 18:30)

UK-based medical device company Lightpoint Medical has entered into an exclusive global license agreement with the University of Arizona for Beta Emission Tomography (BET), a molecular imaging technology.

UK-based medical device company Lightpoint Medical has entered into an exclusive global license agreement with the University of Arizona for Beta Emission Tomography (BET), a molecular imaging technology.

BET was developed by Professor Harrison Barrett, Regents Professor of Radiology and Optical Science, associating with his student Yijun Ding and colleague Dr Luca Caucci at the University of Arizona Center for Gamma Ray Imaging.

Lightpoint intends to introduce the molecular imaging technology in the operating room to guide cancer surgery in real-time which previously was unavailable.

"This collaboration with Lightpoint is an ideal way to move this important work from the world of research out to where it can directly impact patient care."

The technology is seen as a new approach towards Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging which enables the miniaturisation of a PET scanner to make it accessible in the operating room.

Tech Launch Arizona has facilitated the licensing process.

Following the agreement, the new technology will be integrated into Lightpoint Medical's product for image-guided cancer surgery.

Tech Launch Arizona technology transfer senior director Doug Hockstad said: "This collaboration with Lightpoint is an ideal way to move this important work from the world of research out to where it can directly impact patient care."

BET offers autoradiography methods and devices for high-resolution 3D imaging of the distribution of a radioactive probe in an intact, unsectioned tissue sample without requiring the physical slicing the samples.

The system can detect beta particle radiated by a radioactive composition within in-vivo or ex-vivo tissue to offer a plurality of position dependent signals to characterise individual trajectories of the detected beta particles, facilitating accurate determinations of a 3D distribution of the source of particles within the tissue.