Mevion unveils pencil beam scanning technology at ASTRO 2016

22 September 2016 (Last Updated September 22nd, 2016 18:30)

US-based Mevion Medical Systems has unveiled its pencil beam scanning Hyperscan with Adaptive Aperture at the 2016 ASTRO Annual Meeting in Boston, US.

US-based Mevion Medical Systems has unveiled its pencil beam scanning Hyperscan with Adaptive Aperture at the 2016 ASTRO Annual Meeting in Boston, US.

The proton micro-multileaf collimator (mMLC) technology has been added to Mevion S250i with Hyperscan which had rendered the pencil beam scanning sharper and faster, delivering the intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT).

Mevion's S250 has been designed based on the gantry-mounted proton accelerator and uses Mevion’s patented direct beam technology.

It has been developed to provide high-powered, efficient proton therapy treatments with an improved beam quality, stability and uptime.

Hyperscan fitted with the Adaptive Aperture emits a pencil beam is 50 times faster and three times sharper than conventional systems used for IMPT, and has the ability to scan a typical lung tumour in less than two seconds.

The technology features a low-profile mMLC system used for pencil beam scanning that is capable of delivering the sharpest penumbra physically achievable with protons without requiring manual apertures and adjustments.

"It has been developed to provide high-powered, efficient proton therapy treatments with an improved beam quality, stability and uptime."

Its layer-by-layer specific beam collimation and blocking results in a 1-3mm collimated spot sizes suited for all energies, at any depth.

Mevion senior accelerator engineer James Cooley said: “HYPERSCAN with Adaptive Aperture has been precisely engineered to deliver the sharpest penumbra achievable by protons, thus minimising dose uncertainty at the target edges and unnecessary dose to surrounding healthy tissue.

“With a very low profile, the adaptive aperture is ideal for treating pediatric tumours or shallow brain tumours where small spot sizes have been difficult to achieve by conventional systems.”


Image: HYPERSCAN with Adaptive Aperture. Photo: courtesy of Business Wire.