Mitralign completes patient enrolment in early feasibility study of Trialign System to treat FTR

14 July 2016 (Last Updated July 14th, 2016 18:30)

US-based medical device company Mitralign has finished enrolling patients in the early feasibility study, Scout, to test its Trialign System for transcatheter repair of functional tricuspid regurgitation (FTR).

US-based medical device company Mitralign has finished enrolling patients in the early feasibility study, Scout, to test its Trialign System for transcatheter repair of functional tricuspid regurgitation (FTR).

According to Mitralign CEO Rick Geoffrion, the company has enrolled an initial group of fifteen people marking the initiation of the first US feasibility test to evaluate the transcathether device in treating patients suffering from tricuspid regurgitation.

NewYork-Presbyterian / Columbia University Medical Center Interventional Echocardiography director and Scout study principal investigator Rebecca Hahn said: “The clinical community is excited about the potential opportunity to provide a breakthrough non-surgical option for patients with tricuspid regurgitation.

“We know the number of people suffering with tricuspid regurgitation is much bigger than previously reported, and we are in the nascent stages of treating this large, unaddressed population.

“The Trialign System leaves behind a very small footprint, so we believe this device has the potential to be a front line solution for patients with functional TR.”

"The Trialign System leaves behind a very small footprint, so we believe this device has the potential to be a front line solution for patients with functional TR."

The tricuspid valve is located between the right atrium and the right ventricle which opens to allow blood to be pumped from the right atrium in to the right ventricle.

The valve closes as soon as the blood makes its way through it so that it cannot pass back.

Tricuspid regurgitation (TR) occurs when the tricuspid valve cannot open and close properly, causing blood to flow backward into the right atrium.

TR can cause heart enlargement and heart failure if it is not treated.


Image: Echocardiography hinting at severe tricuspid regurgitation. Photo: courtesy of AMC Echolab via Wikipedia.