New device detects rare progressive lung disease by sniffing patient’s breath

4 September 2016 (Last Updated September 4th, 2016 18:30)

Université Paris-Saclay has adopted the Technion Israel Institute of Technology developed device for the diagnosis of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH).

Université Paris-Saclay has adopted the Technion Israel Institute of Technology developed device for the diagnosis of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH).

The device called the e-nose, is composed of gold nanoparticles coupled with chemical modules and can detect the rare progressive lung disease by analysing a patient’s breath.

It is expected to pave the way for an appropriate diagnosis of this rare form of high-blood pressure.

"The e-nose is a non-invasive and safe detection method that means general screening of PAH could eventually be made available."

Developed by the Technion Israel Institute of Technology team headed by Professor Hossam Haick, e-nose was originally intended to be used for the diagnosis of cancer.

Doctor Sylvia Cohen-Kaminsky from Université Paris-Saclay proposed for the application of the device for PAH which had similar characteristics as that of cancer.

The team has created the international associated lab between Inserm, the Technion, and Université Paris-Sud and had documented and released the proof of concept which validated the detection of PAH using the e-nose.

Kaminsky said: “The gold standard for the diagnosis of PAH is right heart catheterism, which can make the right diagnosis, but it is invasive, risky and unsuitable for widespread screening.

“The e-nose is a non-invasive and safe detection method that means general screening of PAH could eventually be made available.”

Professor Marc Humbert from Université Paris-Sud is heading a large clinical trial sponsored by the public hospital system in Paris, Assistance Publique Hopitaux de Paris to validate the usage of e-nose in the detection of PAH.