Nova Bio-Pharma wins US patent for vaccines stability device

5 October 2014 (Last Updated October 5th, 2014 18:30)

Nova Bio-Pharma Technologies has received a US patent for its vaccine stabilisation device HydRIS, which allows pharmaceuticals to be dried and stabilised onto a fibrous membrane, keeping them stable over a wide temperature range, long-term.

Nova Bio-Pharma Technologies has received a US patent for its vaccine stabilisation device HydRIS, which allows pharmaceuticals to be dried and stabilised onto a fibrous membrane, keeping them stable long-term over a wide temperature range.

HydRIS is the trademark name for hypodermic rehydration injection system.

The membrane is encased in a small, custom-designed housing, which can attach a standard needle and syringe.

At the point of use, liquid in the syringe is flushed through the device and the re-hydrated active ingredient is delivered via the needle, in a single action.

The company delivers instantly injectable, highly stable vaccines and other medicines at temperatures from below 0°C to 50°C and could revolutionise vaccine supplies in the developing world by removing the need for cold storage.

Nova stabilisation project manager Sam de Costa said: "We have an enabling technology to stabilise highly temperature sensitive medicines, such as live viral and bacterial vector vaccines and certain proteins, while meeting the growing demand for injectables, and this patent success is a boost to everyone involved in this field of medicine."

"We have an enabling technology to stabilise highly temperature sensitive medicines, while meeting the growing demand for injectables."

The company has evaluated HydRIS in collaboration with a number of pharmaceutical manufacturers and leading academic institutes, where the products were kept stable for prolonged periods at elevated temperatures without product degradation.

The device can be used in therapeutics, field medicine, emergency medicine, bio-defence and diagnostics, veterinary applications and pandemic preparations.

The company said that by developing vaccines that can be stored at ambient temperatures in any location, the developing world could cut the needless waste of vaccines destroyed from improper storage, and the costs and logistics needed with the cold storage chain.

Costa said: "The market is seeking new forms of drugs delivery to improve all stages of its lifecycle - from manufacture to administration and storage.

"We are engaged in many projects to develop new products or re-invigorate older ones looking to extend their value, and this patent offers added security for those seeking to invest in new technologies with us."