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May 29, 2017

oDocs introduces new smartphone-based devices to aid retina imaging

New Zealand-based social enterprise oDocs Eye Care has launched two smartphone-based devices called visoScope and visoClip for imaging of the human retina.

New Zealand-based social enterprise oDocs Eye Care has launched two smartphone-based devices called visoScope and visoClip for imaging of the human retina.

Developed by a team led by Dunedin Hospital’s ophthalmology registrar Dr Hong Sheng Chiong, visoScope is a smartphone retinal imaging adapter, while visoClip is a smartphone slit lamp microscope.

Designed for anti-reflective and 50° fields of view, the durable and waterproof visoScope acts as a portable retinal camera when attached to an iPhone.

The smartphone ophthalmoscope also features bi-aspheric design for decreased optical irregularity, anti-reflective coating, thumbscrew, and cross-polarisation for minimising glare and reflection.

Suitable for acute corneal lesion images, photo-documentation and telemedicine, visoClip uses angled illumination to take high-resolution images of the front third of the eye.

"The waterproof microscope comes with broad-beam illumination for detecting conditions such as conjunctivitis, scleritis, corneal infections, acute anterior uveitis and cataract."

The waterproof microscope comes with broad-beam illumination for detecting conditions such as conjunctivitis, scleritis, corneal infections, acute anterior uveitis and cataract, as well as dual optical filters of cobalt blue and white light to enhance functionality.

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The firm has agreed to maintain the devices as open-sources by making them affordable and accessible. 

Dr Hong said: “We have made them extremely affordable and accessible to benefit regions most in need. Conventional equipment would cost around $20,000–$30,000, whereas our devices cost a hundredth of that.”

Being compatible with 3D printing and additive manufacturing, the devices allow file download from the web and 3D printing of the eye equipment locally, saving time and cost.


Image: When attached to an iPhone, visoScope converts the phone into a retinal camera. Photo: courtesy of oDocs Eye Care.

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