Paragon 28 introduces new titanium wedges for flatfoot deformities

9 April 2017 (Last Updated April 9th, 2017 18:30)

Foot and ankle surgery devices developer Paragon 28 has introduced its titanium-based TITAN 3D Wedge system to help with flatfoot deformities.

Paragon 28 introduces new titanium wedges for flatfoot deformities

Foot and ankle surgery devices developer Paragon 28 has introduced its titanium-based TITAN 3D Wedge system to help with flatfoot deformities. 

Based on the firm's portfolio of osteotomy wedges, the new porous wedges have patented shapes similar to those of the current PRESERVE Evans and Cotton wedges.

Developed as a substitute to autograft and allograft bone, the titanium wedges feature open geometry and a three-dimensional scaffold to enable blood entry, bone through growth, and biologics incorporation.

A central opening is included in the wedges to facilitate passage of a 3.5mm or 4mm screw across the osteotomy for enhancing the construct's stability.

The patented PRECISION GUIDE system has been leveraged to place the crossing screw precisely and consistently.

The wedges are made up of spikes to reduce the implant expulsion risk and increase the coefficient of friction, and do not need an ancillary surface plate.

"A central opening is included in the wedges to facilitate passage of a 3.5mm or 4mm screw across the osteotomy for enhancing the construct's stability."

Product specific inserters with a strike plate are included in the system to allow accurate implantation and the presence of resection guides minimises excessive bone removal.

Last month, the firm launched a series of 20 low profile plates called Gorilla Calc Fracture Plating system for calcaneal fracture.

Classified into three families, the system includes intraoperatively contourable lateral extensile approach and sinus tarsi approach plates.

The system also features a dissection tool, sinus tarsi inserter, sinus tarsi incision guide, schanz pins and T-handle to enable dissection and precise plate placement.


Image: Sinus Tarsi Support Plate. Photo: courtesy of PRNewsFoto/Paragon 28, Inc.