Personal Genome Diagnostics and VA extend cancer testing contract

22 March 2017 (Last Updated March 22nd, 2017 18:30)

Personal Genome Diagnostics (PGDx) has expanded its cancer testing contract with the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to replace a previous tumour profiling assay with the new CancerSELECT 125 test.

Personal Genome Diagnostics (PGDx) has expanded its cancer testing contract with the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to replace a previous tumour profiling assay with the new CancerSELECT 125 test.

CancerSELECT 125 is a pan-cancer profiling test that utilises a biomarker called microsatellite instability status (MSI) to evaluate the potential patient response to checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapies.

The new cancer test will be available to patients treated at VA centres in the country.

"The test detects clinically actionable and functionally important sequence mutations and structural alterations across various cancer types."

PGDx chief executive officer Doug Ward said: "PGDx helped pioneer the VA's Precision Oncology Program (POP) in 2015, and our involvement has grown as the POP has expanded from a regional lung cancer initiative into a nationwide effort covering all types of cancer.

"We believe our new CancerSELECT 125 pan-cancer targeted profiling assay is unsurpassed in its clinical relevance and accuracy, and it is one of the few that includes the MSI testing essential for effective use of the new immunotherapies."

The test detects clinically actionable and functionally important sequence mutations and structural alterations across various cancer types.

It uses the the firm's proprietary technologies and bioinformatics for the identification of sequence mutations with accuracy.

Selected based on the biological, functional relevance and clinical actionability, the genes incorporated in the test are expected to assist in decision-making for the treatment.

The cancer assay also reports MSI to evaluate potential response to checkpoint inhibitor therapies, as the tumours with high MSI are said to have a greater clinical response to the new cancer immunotherapies.