Precision NanoSystems unveils NanoAssemblr Spark system for nanomedicine development

20 July 2016 (Last Updated July 20th, 2016 18:30)

Canada-based Precision NanoSystems (PNI) has unveiled the NanoAssemblr Spark system to assist the development of nucleic acid-based nanomedicines, including mRNA and CRISPR/Cas9 therapeutics.

Canada-based Precision NanoSystems (PNI) has unveiled the NanoAssemblr Spark system to assist the development of nucleic acid-based nanomedicines, including mRNA and CRISPR/Cas9 therapeutics.

The NanoAssemblr Spark system allows microfluidic manufacture of nanoparticles at ultra-low volumes in an automated way.

It helps to promote a fast and cost-effective nanomedicine discovery and development at an early stage.

PNI CEO and co-founder Dr James Taylor said: "The NanoAssemblr Spark will facilitate more rapid development of exciting new therapeutic modalities such as genome editing and mRNA-mediated protein expression.

"The Spark complements the current NanoAssemblr Benchtop instrument, which uses microfluidics to manufacture nanoparticles at the milliliter scale, and helps move us towards our goal of providing a suite of microfluidic-based instruments for the seamless, accelerated development of nanomedicines from discovery to commercial product."

"The NanoAssemblr Spark will facilitate more rapid development of exciting new therapeutic modalities such as genome editing and mRNA-mediated protein expression."

The system uses the patented microfluidics technology to facilitate a controlled and reproducible manufacture of 25µL to 250µL nanoparticles in less than ten seconds.

After nearing a yield of almost 100%, the Spark is applicable for screening novel nanoparticle formulations that use the rare and expensive nucleic acid constructs and nanoparticle excipients.

Apart from nanoparticle design and screening, the NanoAssemblr Spark system can be leveraged on a range of applications which are gene delivery and screening; targeted delivery of small molecules; drug development and development of lipid nanoparticles.


Image: The NanoAssemblr Spark instrument. Photo: courtesy of PRNewsFoto/Precision NanoSystems, Inc.