PSA test could predict low-risk prostate cancer, says study

26 October 2011 (Last Updated October 26th, 2011 03:30)

A study by Mayo clinic has found that the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test could be a vital tool in predicting which men should have biopsies and which are likely to be diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer.

A study by Mayo clinic has found that the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test could be a vital tool in predicting which men should have biopsies and which are likely to be diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer.

The study reported that men in their 40s and 50s with a baseline PSA at or above the median PSA are more likely to undergo a biopsy and be diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer.

The PSA test measures the amount of PSA, a protein produced by cells of the prostate gland, in the patient's blood. It allows physicians to determine a patient's potential risk of developing prostate cancer.

High PSA levels may occur due to benign prostate enlargement or inflammation of the urinary tract.