RenovaCare reports positive results from laboratory studies of CellMist and SkinGun technologies

4 May 2016 (Last Updated May 4th, 2016 18:30)

US-based medical device company RenovaCare has reported positive results after laboratory studies conducted by Berlin-Brandenburg Center for Regenerative Therapies (BCRT) on its CellMist and SkinGun technologies.

Skingun

US-based medical device company RenovaCare has reported positive results after laboratory studies conducted by Berlin-Brandenburg Center for Regenerative Therapies (BCRT) on its CellMist and SkinGun technologies.

The study has exhibited that human skin stem cells sprayed with the company's patented SkinGun device maintained 97.3% viability.

Cell viability is considered necessary to regenerate skin for burns, wounds and cosmetic applications.

Cell growth was comparable to pipetting, the industry's widely accepted gold-standard for the deposition of cells.

Study authors Dr Christa Johnen, Nadja Strahl and Dr Katrin Zeilinger said: "The results show that the described method consistently allows isolating keratinocytes with characteristics suitable for therapeutic applications.

"This indicates that use of the SkinGun for spray application of keratinocytes may allow for even distribution of cells with no impairment of cell viability or cell growth when evaluated in-vitro, in contrast to those evaluations with conventionally seeded cells."

"This indicates that use of the SkinGun for spray application of keratinocytes may allow for even distribution of cells with no impairment of cell viability or cell growth when evaluated in-vitro."

The study was also aimed at assessing factors contributing to regeneration of human skin, including cell yield, viability, metabolic activity, and cell growth which had also reported positive.

The investigators have recorded favorable metabolic activity from measurements of glucose consumption and lactate release after spraying skin stem cells using the RenovaCare SkinGun.

Cell morphology was evaluated by microscopic observation, and cell integrity was determined by Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release.

The study was funded by RenovaCare and the tissue samples for skin cell isolation were received from surgical treatments with approval of the Charité ethical committee.


Image: The RenovaCare SkinGun. Photo: courtesy of RenovaCare, Inc.