Swedish medical technology company SciBase has unveiled its new instrument, Nevisense View for early detection of malignant melanoma.

The device features the company’s patented electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) which offers visual information derived from the digital dermascopy to facilitate an improved and simplified diagnostic process.

The mechanism of the device uses electrical impulses to detect abnormal cell structures indicative of malignant melanoma.

"The use of EIS can reduce the number of cases that need to be followed up using SDDI by almost half."

Digital dermascopy creates visual evaluations of skin lesions' using a dermascope, as the short term digital dermoscopy imaging (SDDI) is leveraged in hard-to-diagnose cases to compare pictures of lesions which have undergone change with time.

SciBase’s Nevisense View simplifies the process of conducting skin examinations as it saves all data derived from the exam in the same instrument.

Its ability to track the changes of a suspicious lesion, using EIS values and images, aids in preventing the unnecessary removal of benign tissue, and helps to avoid malignant melanoma going undetected during an examination.

The device is enabled with wireless transmission of images and is designed with easy-to-use follow-up functions with a shared screen to compare lesions over time.

SciBase CEO Simon Grant said: “According to a new study, conducted by researchers from Melanoma Institute of Australia and Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney, the use of EIS can reduce the number of cases that need to be followed up using SDDI by almost half, and may also allow for early detection of malignant melanoma three months earlier than traditional methods.”