Siemens Healthcare gets FDA clearance for next-generation Dual Source CT system

24 April 2014 (Last Updated April 24th, 2014 01:00)

Siemens Healthcare has obtained US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance for its Somatom Force, the company’s next-generation Dual Source computed tomography (CT) system.

Siemens Healthcare has obtained US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance for its Somatom Force, the company's next-generation Dual Source computed tomography (CT) system.

The Somatom Force's faster imaging and precise diagnostic capabilities allow low-dose CT for broader groups of patients.

The system extends CT imaging capabilities and dose-reduction features to some of the most challenging patients, such as those who are very young, suffering from renal insufficiency and those who are unable to hold their breath.

"The Somatom Force represents a dramatic leap forward in CT technology, helping healthcare organisations improve diagnostic confidence with access to an imaging tool that maximises the patient experience for many more people in their communities."

Siemens Healthcare CT and radiation oncology business management vice-president Murat Gungor said: "The Somatom Force represents a dramatic leap forward in CT technology, helping healthcare organisations improve diagnostic confidence with access to an imaging tool that maximises the patient experience for many more people in their communities."

Patients suffering from renal insufficiency can benefit from imaging on the Somatom Force, which has the potential to allow radiologists to use significantly less contrast medium. Lowering of the contrast medium is achieved via the two Vectron x-ray tubes in Somatom Force.

According to the company, the Somatom is able to freeze motion via a versatile scanning mode that can perform an exam in roughly one second.

Similar to several new CT scanners available on the market, the Somatom delivers routine adult imaging with fast, low-dose protocols achieved through the power reserves of the scanner's Vectron tube.

Medical University of South Carolina director of CT R&D and professor of radiology and cardiology Dr Joseph Schoepf said: "The massively enhanced tube power of the SOMATOM Force enables imaging that can be acquired at very low kV settings, and thus at a lower level of radiation dose - routinely in adult patients and even those of a larger body type. In the past, these low kV settings would have resulted in noisy, nondiagnostic studies."

Due to its low kV imaging, the Somatom broadens CT's application for patients with renal insufficiency. In addition, the new CT scanner could help with preventive health care through low-dose lung and colon imaging.

Dr Lawrence Tanenbaum is an author of numerous published studies on the benefits of low kV imaging and an internationally recognised expert in neuroradiology.

"The Somatom Force enables routine 70kV imaging, a technique poised to make a tremendous impact in day-to-day scanning of adult and pediatric patients, with benefits such as decreased radiation dose and impressive time-resolved imaging," Tanenbaum said.