Smith & Nephew unveils first 3D-printed titanium hip implant

1 March 2016 (Last Updated March 1st, 2016 18:30)

British medical technology firm Smith & Nephew has unveiled its first 3D-printed titanium hip implant at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) annual meeting in Orlando, US.

Redapt

British medical technology firm Smith & Nephew has unveiled its first 3D-printed titanium hip implant at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) annual meeting in Orlando, US.

At the event, the company exhibited the new Redapt revision acetabular fully porous cup with Conceloc technology.

Last November, the company received 510(k) clearance for the Redapt cup from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The company noted that the Conceloc advanced porous titanium technology is an alternative to external porous coatings, such as sintered beads or fibre mesh, used in other uncemented implants.

Smith & Nephew global reconstruction vice-president Mike Donoghue said: "We're excited about the creative possibilities this new manufacturing process holds for surgeons and their patients.

"Bringing to market a 3D-printed titanium acetabular cup for difficult revision procedures is just one example of the potential of this remarkable technology."

The new Redapt cup has been developed for use in revision cases where compromised bone makes implant fixation and stability more difficult.

In order to support the growth, the 3D manufacturing process will be used to produce an entirely porous implant, which mimics the structure of cancellous bone.

"Bringing to market a 3D-printed titanium acetabular cup for difficult revision procedures is just one example of the potential of this remarkable technology."

New variable-angle locking screws will be used to improve implant stability and reduce micromotion after surgery.

The company noted that successful fixation of a porous implant requires it to remain in steady, stationary contact with the bone as it heals and new bone grows.

Redapt variable-angle locking screws, as well as traditional non-locking screws, work within the implant's geometry to provide both compression and a rigid construct to the acetabular shell.

The 3D-printed titanium hip implants are available at selected sites in the US.


Image: The new Redapt revision acetabular fully porous cup with Conceloc technology. Photo: courtesy of PRNewsFoto/Smith & Nephew.